Wage & Hour

  • May 29, 2024

    TGI Fridays Ducked Uniform Maintenance Pay, NY Servers Say

    TGI Fridays ducked New York regulations requiring employers to pay for the maintenance of workers' uniforms while also evading minimum wage laws for tipped workers, three servers said in a proposed collective and class action filed in federal court Tuesday.

  • May 29, 2024

    Flowers Foods Subsidiary Must Face Wage Claims

    A California federal judge cut two subsidiaries of Flowers Foods from a suit alleging workers were misclassified as independent contractors, but left a third on the hook for unpaid overtime wages and failure to reimburse claims after finding the worker was integral to the subsidiary's business.

  • May 29, 2024

    Fisher Phillips Adds Employment Pro In Dallas From GRSM50

    Fisher Phillips has strengthened its Dallas roster with a litigator experienced in representing employers in a broad array of complex labor and employment disputes who came aboard from Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP.

  • May 28, 2024

    Kia, Hyundai Still Face RICO Claims In Foreign Labor Suit

    Hyundai and Kia are still confronted with claims that they were in on a scheme to obtain cheap labor from skilled Mexican engineers seeking participation in a professional visa program after a Georgia federal judge determined workers had adequately alleged the companies' involvement.

  • May 28, 2024

    Apple Affiliate Says 'Biased Witnesses' Merit Verdict Reversal

    An Apple-affiliated repair company is taking another shot at escaping claims of wage and hour violations in a multistate wage class action, asking a North Carolina federal judge for a directed verdict or new trial based on what the company characterized as insufficient evidence.

  • May 28, 2024

    A Worker Advocate On Desegregating The Workforce

    Rebecca Dixon, a leader in workers' rights, said that major policy reforms like revising the Fair Labor Standards Act are needed to overcome the occupational segregation that characterizes today's workforce. Here, Dixon speaks to Law360 about the effects of occupational segregation and what needs to be done to address it.

  • May 28, 2024

    Healthcare Tech Co. To Pay $1.5M To End Class Wage Claims

    A healthcare software consulting company agreed to a $1.5 million deal resolving claims it violated Washington state wage law by requiring its software training staff to work up to 80 hours and seven days a week, according to a motion to approve the deal filed in federal court.

  • May 28, 2024

    Kroger, Albertsons Must Give FTC Texts, Written Notes

    Claims from a pair of multibillion-dollar grocery giants that a discovery request will pose financial burden held no sway over a Federal Trade Commission in-house judge who last week ordered Kroger and Albertsons to produce text messages and handwritten notes from key employees as part of the agency's merger challenge.

  • May 28, 2024

    Amazon Driver Says Order Clearly Axed Misclassification Suit

    A now-retired federal judge clearly dismissed a suit claiming Amazon misclassified workers as independent contractors when she pushed it into arbitration, the Amazon flex driver suing the company told a New Jersey federal court.

  • May 28, 2024

    O'Reilly Auto Parts Inks $4.1M COVID Screening Settlement

    O'Reilly Auto Enterprises has agreed to pay $4.1 million to settle a California wage and hour lawsuit alleging that the company should have paid workers for the time they spent undergoing COVID-19 screenings before shifts and for work performed during meal breaks, according to a court memo.

  • May 28, 2024

    Littler Brings On Ogletree Pay Equity Leader In NYC

    Employment and labor law giant Littler Mendelson PC announced Tuesday that it has grown its New York team with the addition of a pay transparency law expert and former pay equity practice group co-chair at Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • May 28, 2024

    Calif. Ups Prosecutor Budgets By $8.6M To Fight Wage Theft

    More than a dozen public prosecutors in California will receive nearly $8.6 million from the state to set up wage theft enforcement programs, the California Department of Industrial Relations announced.

  • May 28, 2024

    Contractor Rule Doesn't Hurt Groups Challenging It, DOL Says

    The U.S. Department of Labor's final rule sorting out workers' independent contractor classification incorporates long-used standards, and therefore the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and other groups' arguments of harm aren't plausible, the department told a Texas federal court.

  • May 28, 2024

    Transit Co., Bus Drivers' Wage Deal OK'd

    An Ohio federal judge placed the final stamp of approval Tuesday on a $200,000 deal between a transportation company and the bus drivers accusing it of failing to pay them overtime wages.

  • May 24, 2024

    Workers' Atty Says 'Game Over' For Hospital On Wage Liability

    Counsel for a group of workers said Friday it was "game over" for a Seattle-area hospital system facing a class action suit for allegedly violating state law with its break policy, urging a judge to rule the system was liable because it acknowledged workers on long shifts didn't take a second mealtime.

  • May 24, 2024

    9th Circ. Says H-2A Employers Must Pay Highest Wages

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday said the U.S. Department of Labor can't let employers pay foreign farmworkers on H-2A visas a lower wage rate, rejecting the department's argument that the matter is moot because the previous harvest season is over.

  • May 24, 2024

    Jazz Director Accuses Philly Pops, Execs Of RICO Conspiracy

    A former Philly Pops jazz director has sued the defunct orchestra group, its ex-CEO, a rival orchestra, the Kimmel Center and others in Pennsylvania federal court, claiming they conspired to monopolize the orchestral music market and lied about the organization's debt to force it to shut down while depriving him of pay.

  • May 24, 2024

    CVS Hit With PAGA Suit Alleging OT, Records Violations

    CVS Pharmacy Inc. regularly requires employees to work overtime due to understaffing and unreasonably high workloads without appropriately compensating them, and the company alters records by clocking employees out to make it seem it is complying with labor laws, according to a lawsuit filed Thursday in California state court.

  • May 24, 2024

    Ex-Employee, Furnisher Renew Settlement Bid In FLSA Suit

    A corporate office furnisher and a former employee who alleged he was fired after complaining about unpaid overtime have once again asked a Georgia federal judge to approve a settlement between them, saying they cured all issues identified by the judge when he refused to approve the deal in April.

  • May 24, 2024

    5th Circ. Again Upholds Engineers' OT Win

    A Fifth Circuit panel on Friday backed for the second time a lower court's ruling that two engineers receiving a weekly minimum salary as part of their compensation package were not overtime-exempt and sent the case back to the district court to determine damages awards.

  • May 24, 2024

    Cleaning Co. Should Pay Up In SEIU Arb. Case, Judge Says

    A cleaning company and its related entities should be required to compensate terminated workers with more than $22,000 stemming from an arbitration award, a New York federal magistrate judge recommended Friday, saying a Service Employees International Union affiliate showed the businesses were alter egos.

  • May 24, 2024

    4 Places That Are Leading The Gig Worker Pay Push

    A growing list of cities and states are setting mandatory wage floors for gig workers, who are typically classified as independent contractors and therefore not eligible for minimum wage protections. Here, Law360 explores places with minimum pay for gig workers.

  • May 24, 2024

    NY Forecast: School Pushes To Arbitrate Retaliation Case

    On Thursday, a federal judge will consider a Buffalo, New York, Catholic school's bid to compel arbitration of claims brought by a former president who says she was retaliated against after she uncovered financial and academic issues at the school.

  • May 24, 2024

    Applicants Lack Fed. Standing For Wash. Pay Range Lawsuit

    A Washington federal judge sent back to state court a lawsuit alleging an employer violated a new state requirement to include pay ranges in job advertisements, finding that a job listing without pay information does not harm job applicants enough to justify a federal lawsuit.

  • May 24, 2024

    3 Tips To Manage Summer's Tricky Child Labor Landscape

    Amid an uptick in enforcement against child labor violations, a changing landscape for state laws on youth employment and the unofficial start of summer hiring season, attorneys tell Law360 three ways employers can stay in compliance with their new and temporary young employees.

Expert Analysis

  • How New Pregnancy, Nursing Laws Surpass Prior Protections

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    Employers must understand how the new Pregnant Workers Fairness and PUMP Acts build on existing federal workplace laws — and they will need to make key updates to ensure compliance, say Alexandra Garrison Barnett and Leigh Shapiro at Alston & Bird, and Kandis Wood Jackson at McKinsey & Co.

  • 6th Circ. FLSA Class Opt-In Ruling Levels Field For Employers

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    By rejecting the established approach for determining whether other employees are similarly situated to the original plaintiffs in a Fair Labor Standards Act suit, the Sixth Circuit in Clark v. A&L Homecare reshaped the balance of power in favor of employer-defendants in FLSA collective actions, say Melissa Kelly and Gregory Abrams at Tucker Ellis.

  • FMLA Confusion Persists Despite New DOL Advisory

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    A recent U.S. Department of Labor advisory opinion provides some clarity regarding the Family and Medical Leave Act's handling of holiday weeks, but the FMLA remains a legal minefield that demands fact-specific analysis of each employee's unique situation, says Nicholas Schneider at Eckert Seamans.

  • East Penn Verdict Is An FLSA Cautionary Tale For Employers

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    A Pennsylvania federal jury's recent $22 million verdict against East Penn set a record for the Fair Labor Standards Act and should serve as a reminder to employers that failure to keep complete wage and hour records can exponentially increase liability exposure under the FLSA, say Benjamin Hinks and Danielle Lederman at Bowditch & Dewey.

  • Pay Transparency Laws Complicate Foreign Labor Cert.

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    State and local laws adopted to help close the gender pay gap pose challenges for U.S. companies recruiting foreign nationals, as they try to navigate a thicket of pay transparency laws without running afoul of federally regulated recruitment practices, say Stephanie Pimentel and Asha George at Berry Appleman.

  • 2 Ways Calif. Justices' PAGA Ruling May Play Out

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    In Adolph v. Uber, the California Supreme Court will soon decide whether an employee’s representative Private Attorneys General Act claims can stay in court when their individual claims go to arbitration — either exposing employers to battles in multiple forums, or affirming arbitration agreements’ ability to extinguish nonindividual claims, says Justin Peters at Carlton Fields.

  • How To Navigate Class Incentive Awards After Justices' Denial

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    Despite a growing circuit split on the permissibility of incentive awards, the U.S. Supreme Court recently declined to hear cases on the issue, meaning class action defendants must consider whether to agree to incentive awards as part of a classwide settlement and how to best structure the agreement, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Check Onboarding Docs To Protect Arbitration Agreements

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    The California Court of Appeal's recent Alberto v. Cambrian Homecare decision opens a new and unexpected avenue of attack on employment arbitration agreements in California — using other employment-related agreements to render otherwise enforceable arbitration agreements unenforceable, say Morgan Forsey and Ian Michalak at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Remote Work Considerations In A Post-Pandemic World

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    Now that the public health emergency has ended, employers may reevaluate their obligations to allow remote work, as well as the extent to which they must compensate remote working expenses, though it's important to examine any requests under the Americans With Disabilities Act, say Dan Kaplan and Jacqueline Hayduk at Foley & Lardner.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Remote Work Policies

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    Implementing a remote work policy that clearly articulates eligibility, conduct and performance expectations for remote employees can ease employers’ concerns about workers they may not see on a daily basis, says Melissa Spence at Butler Snow.

  • An Overview Of Calif. Berman Hearings For Wage Disputes

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    While California's Berman hearings are pro-employee procedures that are accessible, informal and affordable mechanisms for parties filing a claim to recover unpaid wages, there are some disadvantages to the process such as delays, says David Cheng at FordHarrison.

  • No Blank Space In Case Law On Handling FMLA Abuse

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    Daniel Schwartz at Shipman & Goodwin discusses real-world case law that guides employers on how to handle suspected Family and Medical Leave Act abuse, specifically in instances where employees attended or performed in a concert while on leave — with Taylor Swift’s ongoing Eras Tour as a hypothetical backdrop.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Bias Lessons From 'Partner Track'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with CyberRisk Alliance's Ying Wong, about how Netflix's show "Partner Track" tackles conscious and unconscious bias at law firms, and offer some key observations for employers and their human resources departments on avoiding these biases.