Wage & Hour

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices Will Hear Reservist's Case Over Denied Top-Up Pay

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday said it will hear a federal employee's case over whether he was owed differential pay after being called to active duty in his role as a military reservist, but not directly into a contingency operation.

  • June 21, 2024

    DOL Says Union's Farm Wage Challenge Too Late

    The U.S. Department of Labor has pushed back against a challenge to rules introduced in 2022 that a Washington union said are depressing farmworkers' wages, telling a federal judge Friday that the union should have objected during the rule-making period.

  • June 21, 2024

    11th Circ. Backs Fla. Agency Win In Ex-Warden's FMLA Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit refused Friday to reinstate a former warden's lawsuit accusing the Florida Department of Corrections of transferring and demoting her because she was nearing 60 and took six months of leave, saying she failed to connect the dots to show the agency was motivated by bias.

  • June 21, 2024

    Aramark Sued In Wash. For Alleged Pay Transparency Lapses

    Aramark has been accused of violating Washington state's pay transparency law by failing to give full pay ranges in job postings, according to a proposed class action the food services giant removed to Washington federal court on Thursday.

  • June 21, 2024

    Cathay Pacific Pilots Land $16.65M Deal In 7-Year Wage Fight

    A group of 110 Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. pilots will receive $16.65 million to settle a seven-year wage case alleging that the airline violated Golden State labor laws governing meal and rest periods, overtime and reserve duty pay, according to a preliminary motion for approval filed Thursday in California federal court.

  • June 21, 2024

    Uber, Lyft Can't Dodge Suit Via Arbitration, Calif. Tells Justices

    California has urged the U.S. Supreme Court not to revive bids from Uber and Lyft to arbitrate allegations they unlawfully misclassified drivers as independent contractors, saying it's "commonly understood" that private parties' arbitration agreements have no bearing on whether state officials can sue for state law violations.

  • June 21, 2024

    NY Forecast: 2nd Circ. Weighs Construction Workers' OT Suit

    This week, the Second Circuit will consider a group of construction workers' attempt to revive a proposed class and collective action claiming a group of construction companies failed to pay them overtime required under state and federal law. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • June 21, 2024

    11th Circ. Rules Hotel Operator Liable For Wages As Employer

    A hotel operator exercised enough control over a front desk worker to be his employer and is therefore liable for minimum wage and overtime, the Eleventh Circuit ruled, also noting that a lower court erred in calculating the damages.

  • June 21, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Concentra Fights Cert. Of 350K Job Seekers

    In the coming week, attorneys should keep an eye out for potential class certification and expert disqualification in a suit against Concentra regarding medical inquiries for job applicants. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • June 21, 2024

    Calif. Meat Markets To Pay $309K After DOL Pay Probe

    Three meat markets in California will pay $309,000 in back wages, damages and fines to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging they failed to pay workers overtime rates and obstructed the agency's probe, according to court papers.

  • June 21, 2024

    HCA Wants Out Of Respiratory Therapist's Wage Suit

    Healthcare company HCA said it didn't employ a respiratory therapist accusing the entity of manipulating workers' time sheets and owing them wages, urging a North Carolina federal court to toss the proposed class and collective suit.

  • June 21, 2024

    NY Paid Lactation Break Law Brings Protection, Confusion

    New York state now requires employers to provide paid lactation breaks, representing another boon to equal pay efforts, but questions remain regarding the specifics of compliance and enforcement, attorneys say.

  • June 20, 2024

    Delta's $16M Pay Stub Deal Stalled On Runway By 'Problems'

    A California federal judge said Thursday that he has "problems" giving preliminary approval to Delta Air Lines' $16 million deal in a pay stub class action that went to the Ninth Circuit and the California Supreme Court, saying the settlement's release "seems way overbroad."

  • June 20, 2024

    Logistics Cos. Face Skilled Worker Visa Misuse Class Action

    A pair of logistics companies in the United States face a proposed worker class action alleging they misled prospective employees in Mexico about purported engineering roles that, in reality, were menial labor.

  • June 20, 2024

    Worker Says Co. Inflated Deductions To Duck Prevailing Wage

    An electrical contracting firm overdeducted fringe benefits from the pay of employees who worked on publicly funded projects, dragging down their prevailing wages, a former electrician said in a proposed class action in Pennsylvania state court.

  • June 20, 2024

    Ex-Satellite Tech Drops Wage Suit Against Dish Retailer

    A satellite technician dropped his proposed collective action accusing his former employer of misclassifying him and his co-workers as independent contractors and depriving them of overtime wages, according to a dismissal notice filed in Georgia federal court.

  • June 20, 2024

    11th Circ. Backs Stryker's Defeat Of Fired Worker's Leave Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit refused Thursday to revive a suit claiming medical technology company Stryker illegally fired a worker on leave awaiting the birth of his child, ruling that because the leave didn't formally kick in until the child was born, his termination was fair game.

  • June 20, 2024

    Wind Farm Worker Can't Use Ill. Wage Law For Claim To Pay

    A wind farm does not owe a former office manager continuing royalty payments under Illinois state law, a state appellate court ruled, saying the royalties aren't considered final compensation because the wind farm did not start generating electricity until a year after she retired.

  • June 20, 2024

    As Viking Decision Turns 2, Calif. Seeks Pre-Election PAGA Fix

    California’s governor and lawmakers want to update the state's Private Attorneys General Act before the certification of a proposed ballot measure that would repeal the law, a development happening as the U.S. Supreme Court's Viking ruling on arbitration of claims under the statute turns two. Here, Law360 explores where PAGA stands.

  • June 20, 2024

    NY Construction Co. Denied Workers OT, Suit Says

    A construction company paid workers a flat hourly rate and denied them overtime rates even though they regularly worked more than 40 hours a week, a worker alleged Thursday in a proposed class and collective action in New York federal court.

  • June 20, 2024

    DOL Says Emergency Discovery Needed In OT Rule Challenge

    The U.S. Department of Labor urged a Texas federal court to expedite a targeted request for discovery in a suit seeking to stop a new overtime rule from going into effect, saying that the information is necessary to tackle the injunction bid.

  • June 20, 2024

    Rocket Mortgage Hit With Race Bias, FMLA Suit

    Rocket Mortgage refused to let a Black associate banker transfer positions while letting her white counterparts do so, held her to stricter standards, reduced her wages and eventually terminated her partly due to her use of medical leave, she said in a complaint lodged in Michigan federal court.

  • June 18, 2024

    Newsom, Legislators Reach Agreement On PAGA Reform

    California Gov. Gavin Newsom and state legislative leaders on Tuesday unveiled reforms to California's Private Attorneys General Act, including major changes to the law's penalty structure, changes they say will avoid a "contentious" ballot measure campaign.

  • June 18, 2024

    Amazon Hit With $5.9M Fine For Violating Calif. Quota Law

    California's labor commissioner has fined Amazon $5.9 million for violating the Golden State's Warehouse Quotas Law, which requires employers to give workers written notice of any quotas they must follow, according to a Tuesday announcement.

  • June 18, 2024

    Feds Say Discovery Order Exposes Migrants To Retaliation

    The U.S. Department of Labor is urging a Mississippi federal court to reconsider ordering the disclosure of informants' identities in an investigation into a fish farm's labor practices, saying the May order exposed the informants, who are also migrant employees at the farm, to possible retaliation.

Expert Analysis

  • Water Cooler Talk: 'The Bear' Serves Up Advice For Managers

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with Ernst & Young’s Laura Yehuda about Hulu's "The Bear" and the best practices managers can glean from the show's portrayal of workplace challenges, including those faced by young, female managers.

  • Calif. Employers Note: Industrial Welfare Commission Is Back

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    An appropriations bill recently passed in California instructs the Industrial Welfare Commission to reconvene for the first time in 19 years, opening a door for the regulatory body to significantly affect employer operations by strengthening standards for meal and rest breaks, scheduling, record-keeping, and more, say Denisha McKenzie and John Keeney at CDF Labor Law.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Colorado Antitrust Reform Carries Broad State Impact

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    Colorado recently became the latest state to update and expand its antitrust laws, and the new act may significantly affect enforcement and private litigation, particularly when it comes to workers and consumers, says Diane Hazel at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employer Tips For Fighting Back Against Explosive Verdicts

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    Massive jury verdicts are a product of our time, driven in part by reptile tactics, but employers can build a strategic defense to mitigate the risk of a runaway jury, and develop tools to seek judicial relief in the event of an adverse outcome, say Dawn Solowey and Lynn Kappelman at Seyfarth.

  • Calif. PAGA Ruling Not A Total Loss For Employer Arbitration

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    Contrary to the conclusion reached in a recent Law360 guest article, the California Supreme Court’s ruling in Adolph v. Uber Technologies did not diminish the benefit of arbitrating employees’ individual Private Attorneys General Act claims, as the very limited ruling does not undermine U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says Steven Katz at Constangy.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Changing Status Quo In A Union Shop

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    A recent administrative law decision concerning a dispute between Fortune Media and the NewsGuild of New York is an important reminder to employers with unionized workforces to refrain from making unilateral updates to employee handbooks that will change the terms and conditions of employment, says Jennifer Hataway at Butler Snow.

  • Eye On Compliance: A Shift In Religious Accommodation Law

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    The recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Groff v. DeJoy is making it more difficult for employers to deny religious accommodations, and there are three takeaways employers should keep in mind, say William Cook and Matthew High at Wilson Elser.

  • FLSA Collective Actions: Are Courts Still Dancing The 2-Step?

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    In the absence of amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act, courts have filled in some of the statute's gaps and established a two-step framework for conditional certification of a class, but recent rulings show signs that courts are ready to hold party plaintiffs to a higher standard if they want to recruit others to join their lawsuits, says Allison Powers at Barack Ferrazzano.

  • Calif. PAGA Ruling Devalues Arbitration For Employers

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    The California Supreme Court’s recent opinion in Adolph v. Uber may lessen employers' appetites for arbitration under the state’s Private Attorneys General Act, because arbitrating an allegedly aggrieved employee’s individual claims is unlikely to dispose of their nonindividual claims, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Understanding Illinois' Temp Worker Obligation Updates

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    Recent amendments to the Illinois Day and Temporary Labor Services Act would significantly expand the protection for temporary workers in the state, impose new compliance obligations on staffing agencies and their client companies, and add significant enforcement teeth to the act, say Nicholas Anaclerio and Ellie Hemminger at Vedder Price.

  • How End Of Forced Arb. Is Affecting Sex Harassment Cases

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    A little over a year after the Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault Act became effective, we have started seeing substantive interpretation of the EFAA, almost exclusively from the U.S. district courts in New York, and there are two key takeaways for employers, says Lisa Haldar at Lawrence & Bundy.

  • The Differing Court Approaches To Pay Equity Questions

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    Employers face the tough task of navigating an increasingly complex patchwork of pay equity laws and court interpretations, say attorneys at Hunton.