Wage & Hour

  • July 03, 2024

    Constangy Hires Greenspoon Marder Partner In LA

    Constangy Brooks Smith & Prophete LLP has hired a former deputy attorney general for the California Department of Justice, who is joining from Greenspoon Marder LLP where she led that firm's employment litigation group, the firm announced Wednesday.

  • July 03, 2024

    Gov't Says Justices' Decision Doesn't Fully Solve OT Suit

    The recent U.S. Supreme Court decision pushing deadlines to challenge federal regulations doesn't entirely solve an overtime dispute between three home care companies and the U.S. Department of Labor, the government told the Third Circuit.

  • July 03, 2024

    After Chevron Deference: What Lawyers Need To Know

    This term, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Chevron deference, a precedent established 40 years ago that said when judges could defer to federal agencies' interpretations of law in rulemaking. Here, catch up with Law360's coverage of what is likely to happen next.

  • July 03, 2024

    Nev. Retires Its Unique Two-Tier Minimum Wage

    Nevada has a new minimum wage structure, thanks to a voter-approved ballot question that eliminated a two-tier wage floor that depended on whether an employer offered insurance benefits.

  • July 02, 2024

    Gig Drivers' Union Rights Make It To Mass. Ballot

    Massachusetts voters will decide in November whether to give app-based drivers the right to unionize after supporters of a proposed ballot initiative submitted a batch of signatures to the state Tuesday, the Service Employees International Union announced. 

  • July 02, 2024

    ​​Walgreens Workers Nab Class Cert. In Late Pay Suit

    Walgreens workers can move forward as a class in a lawsuit alleging that the pharmacy chain didn't pay their final paychecks on time, an Oregon federal judge ruled while setting up specific limits on who can join the suit.

  • July 02, 2024

    NY County Must Face Ex-Assistant DA's Leave Bias Suit

    A New York county can't dodge a former assistant district attorney's suit claiming she was unlawfully fired for requesting time off following her husband's cancer diagnosis, with a federal judge ruling more information is needed to determine whether she was misled about her eligibility for leave.

  • July 02, 2024

    6 Major Rulings For Wage-Hour Attorneys So Far In 2024

    In the first half of 2024, the U.S. Supreme Court decided a pair of cases addressing arbitration in wage and hour litigation, the Sixth Circuit weighed minimum wage for pizza delivery drivers and a New York decision created an appellate split on timely pay requirements. Here, Law360 recaps those rulings and four other major decisions so far this year.

  • July 02, 2024

    Tax Consultant's Claim To Commissions Brought In Bad Faith

    A California state appeals court found a wage and hour lawsuit against a tax credit firm was brought in bad faith because the worker lacked evidence to support her allegations, upholding a lower court's ruling and awarding attorney fees and costs to the firm.

  • July 02, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Revive Broadway Producer's Blacklisting Suit

    The Second Circuit declined Tuesday to undo the tossing of an antitrust lawsuit brought by a Broadway producer who accused a stage workers union of illegally putting him on a "do not work" list, ruling that the union is shielded from liability since it acted in legitimate self-interest.

  • July 02, 2024

    Home Care Co., DOL Ink $179K Deal To End Wage Suit

    A Philadelphia home care company will pay more than $179,000 in back wages, damages and fines to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging it failed to pay workers overtime rates, according to court papers.

  • July 02, 2024

    Biz Groups Say Chevron Ruling Crushes DOL Contractor Rule

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision killing the Chevron doctrine shows that the U.S. Department of Labor couldn't toss a Trump-era rule determining workers' independent contractor status and issue a new one, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and other groups told a Texas court.

  • July 02, 2024

    Healthcare Staffing Co. Wants Wage Suit In Arbitration

    A healthcare staffing company urged a Virginia federal judge to toss a proposed collective action accusing it of automatically deducting meal breaks from workers' time sheets and requiring them to perform off-the-clock work, arguing the worker who brought the suit signed a pact to arbitrate any employment disputes.

  • July 02, 2024

    5th Circ. Asks If High Court's Chevron Ruling Affects OT Rule

    The Fifth Circuit asked the U.S. Department of Labor and a Dairy Queen franchisee to address how the recent U.S. Supreme Court's decision nixing the Chevron doctrine affects a challenge to the department's overtime rule.

  • July 02, 2024

    3rd Circ. Asked To Remand OT Suit After Justices' Ruling

    Three home care companies in overtime disputes with the U.S. Department of Labor urged the Third Circuit to reverse and remand a ruling that they waited too long to challenge a 2013 ruling on in-home caregivers' ability to earn minimum wage under a new U.S. Supreme Court precedent.

  • July 01, 2024

    High Court's 1-2 Punch Sets Up Long-Standing Regs For KO

    By ending its term with a stinging combination against federal agencies, the U.S. Supreme Court's conservative bloc left behind a bruised bureaucracy and a regulatory system that's now vulnerable to a barrage of incoming attacks.

  • July 01, 2024

    Workers Accuse Kanye West Of 'Extreme' Racism On The Job

    Eight young app developers have sued "Heartless" rapper Ye, formerly known as Kanye West, his company and its former chief of staff, conservative firebrand Milo Yiannopoulos, in California federal court, alleging they fostered a hostile and abusive working environment, subjecting them to "extreme racism," bullying and harassment without pay.

  • July 01, 2024

    VC Co.'s Ex-Marketing Chief Wins $1.4M Damages In Retrial

    A jury awarded $1.4 million in damages for unpaid bonuses to a former marketing director for a biotechnology-focused venture capital company after a retrial on the damages award, unanimously granting the ex-executive almost the same amount as an earlier award that a New York federal judge opposed.

  • July 01, 2024

    DOL's Overtime Rule Survives Texas Marketer's Injunction Bid

    A Texas federal judge refused Monday to grant a marketing company's request to block a U.S. Department of Labor rule that raises the salary thresholds for claiming overtime-exemption under federal law, saying the firm failed to show it will be harmed by the new standards.

  • July 01, 2024

    Trucking Co. Inks Deal To End Drivers' OT Collective Action

    A trucking company and a group of drivers have reached a deal in a suit that started in 2020 claiming that workers received a "per-ton" compensation that ignored overtime, a Kentucky federal judge has said.

  • July 01, 2024

    Delta Flouts Wash. Pay Transparency Law, Applicant Says

    Delta Air Lines has not been including pay ranges in its job postings in Washington, in violation of a state pay transparency law, an applicant for a position at the airline claimed in a proposed class action seeking to represent over 1,000 potential employees.

  • July 01, 2024

    Wash. Hospital To Pay $1.4M To End Meal Break Wage Suit

    A Washington hospital agreed to shell out $1.4 million to end a lawsuit claiming employees worked through meal breaks without pay, with a medical coder urging a federal court to sign off on the settlement covering about 1,350 workers.

  • July 01, 2024

    Flowers Foods Subsidiary, Workers Settle Wage Suit

    A subsidiary of Flowers Foods and a group of workers told a California federal judge they reached an agreement to settle a lawsuit alleging independent contractor misclassification, two months after a federal judge told the subsidiary it must face the claims.

  • July 01, 2024

    Telecom Worker's Wage Suit Belongs In Arbitration

    A worker suing a telecommunications and electrical contracting company must arbitrate unpaid wages claims because their arbitration agreement is enforceable, a California federal judge ruled.

  • July 01, 2024

    8th Circ. Reverses Sanctions On Ark. Firm Over Fee Award

    The Eighth Circuit has reversed a district court's sanction barring a law firm from participating in Fair Labor Standards Act lawsuits in the Eastern District of Arkansas over reported violations of the rules of civil procedure.

Expert Analysis

  • Lessons On Using 'Advice Of Counsel' Defense In FLSA Suits

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    Several Fair Labor Standards Act cases illustrate the dangers inherent in employers trying to use the advice-of-counsel defense as a shield against liability while attempting to guard attorney-client privilege over relevant communications, says Mark Tabakman at Fox Rothschild.

  • DC Circ. Ruling Puts Issue Class Cert. Under Microscope

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    The D.C. Circuit's recent Harris v. Medical Transportation Management decision, which pushed back against lax application of Rule 23(c)(4) to certify issue classes as an end-run around the predominance requirement, provides potentially persuasive fodder for seeking to limit the scope of issue classes in other circuits, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Ensuring Child Labor Law Compliance Amid Growing Scrutiny

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    Amid increased attention on child labor law violations, employers should review their policies and practices with respect to the employment of minors, particularly underage migrants who do not have any parents in the U.S., say Felicia O'Connor and Morgan McDonald at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employer Best Practices For Pay Transparency Compliance

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    With conflicting pay transparency and disclosure laws appearing across the country, employers must carefully develop different strategies for discussing compensation with employees, applicants, and off-site workers, disclosing salaries in job ads, and staying abreast of new state and local compliance requirements, says Joy Rosenquist at Littler Mendelson.

  • Calif. Cos. May Have To Reimburse More Remote Work Costs

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    After a California appeals court's recent decision in Thai v. IBM, countless California employers will be required to pay work-related costs incurred by their employees who were sent home during the pandemic, and this could be just the beginning of a reckoning, say Sonya Goodwin at Sauer & Wagner.

  • Water Cooler Talk: 'The Bear' Serves Up Advice For Managers

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with Ernst & Young’s Laura Yehuda about Hulu's "The Bear" and the best practices managers can glean from the show's portrayal of workplace challenges, including those faced by young, female managers.

  • Calif. Employers Note: Industrial Welfare Commission Is Back

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    An appropriations bill recently passed in California instructs the Industrial Welfare Commission to reconvene for the first time in 19 years, opening a door for the regulatory body to significantly affect employer operations by strengthening standards for meal and rest breaks, scheduling, record-keeping, and more, say Denisha McKenzie and John Keeney at CDF Labor Law.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Colorado Antitrust Reform Carries Broad State Impact

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    Colorado recently became the latest state to update and expand its antitrust laws, and the new act may significantly affect enforcement and private litigation, particularly when it comes to workers and consumers, says Diane Hazel at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employer Tips For Fighting Back Against Explosive Verdicts

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    Massive jury verdicts are a product of our time, driven in part by reptile tactics, but employers can build a strategic defense to mitigate the risk of a runaway jury, and develop tools to seek judicial relief in the event of an adverse outcome, say Dawn Solowey and Lynn Kappelman at Seyfarth.

  • Calif. PAGA Ruling Not A Total Loss For Employer Arbitration

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    Contrary to the conclusion reached in a recent Law360 guest article, the California Supreme Court’s ruling in Adolph v. Uber Technologies did not diminish the benefit of arbitrating employees’ individual Private Attorneys General Act claims, as the very limited ruling does not undermine U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says Steven Katz at Constangy.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Changing Status Quo In A Union Shop

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    A recent administrative law decision concerning a dispute between Fortune Media and the NewsGuild of New York is an important reminder to employers with unionized workforces to refrain from making unilateral updates to employee handbooks that will change the terms and conditions of employment, says Jennifer Hataway at Butler Snow.

  • Eye On Compliance: A Shift In Religious Accommodation Law

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    The recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Groff v. DeJoy is making it more difficult for employers to deny religious accommodations, and there are three takeaways employers should keep in mind, say William Cook and Matthew High at Wilson Elser.